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A Well-Balanced Home Landscaping Design

One of the basic principles of all art forms, design, including landscape design is balance. It serves as a point of equality. Despite being somewhat insignificant in landscaping, there is actually more to it than just that and it will be explained in much simpler context in this article.

A garden or landscape that is made with equal size would feel and look naturally balanced. However, there are a lot of gardens and landscapes that does not have symmetry in both shape and form. These are called asymmetrical or abstract gardens that usually do not follow the natural balance. Their landscaping usually relies on other things to have balance and harmony through unity of some point. Most often, having no balance is related to having no repetition. To repeat similar elements such as plants or rocks all over the landscape allows the unification of areas towards one another. This can be accomplished with as little as repeating one matching plant group in terms of color or decoration.

Placing too many or non-matching elements all over a landscape design will certainly create a lack of balance. It will usually show as clutter and unkempt when the plant grows. Plan for less during the early stage of your design and just try placing a few matching plant groups all over the garden. It is important to keep the decor matching to the minimum as others can be added later.

There are many landscaping questions regarding the shape of the design. Shape is something that is distinctive to every design that will follow all your paths and visions. However, a shape or form can still be filled with elements and yet will still be dull, void, loud, cluttered, and unbalanced. Balance does not necessarily depend on shape. It can but usually it does not. Never get too attached on trying to achieve balance simply by trying to make things even in shape as all landscaping designs do not follow bilateral symmetry.

Landscape design is regarded as an art form as it deals with all the principles that all other art forms use. Repetition, unity, as well as balance are the major principles of art that go together side by side. The use of repetition is employed by architects in their design or windows, doors, fixtures, trims, etc. with having the same style, shape, and size. Try to visualize how your home would be if each and every door, door frame, windows, and fixtures were made with different sizes and shapes. Surely it would feel somewhat uncomfortable and chaotic. This is the same as with landscape design.

Consistent repetition is required to create balance, appeal, as well as comfort in a landscape that lacks it. In truth, balance can be achieved with as little as placing two matching elements on both side in creating both unity and consistency. Balance is easily achieved through softscape such as plants, ornaments, lawn, decor, etc. However, you should also try to consider having some hardscape such as walks, driveways, necessities, fences, walls, raised beds, and boundaries in your design.

Japanese Landscape Design

The Japanese have been fond of gardens as far as more than 500 years ago, especially when it comes to Zen, a Buddhist practice. One of the main aspects of Zen is all about creating landscape into an art, and thus were the earlier Japanese landscape design.

In today’s world there are about a few dozen Japanese gardens located all over the world, which some are famous, aside from Japan. Of course, the Japanese have their own gardens, whether it’s big or small, but it’s all about the essence of having a small world in their own backyard. For most Americans, it’s mostly just bonsai and bamboo trees, but there are more things to consider when having their own Japanese garden. Japanese landscape design is an art form like brush calligraphy or painting in Japan, and to treat the garden should be a devotion unlike any other.

Most contractors in Japanese landscape design have specialized in creating Japanese gardens, and there are several varieties, which would definitely have its own cost considering the complexity of having such a garden. Some variety of gardens, called dry or rock gardens, utilize hauling over huge rocks, a pump to pour water over the rocks and some clever landscaping to create a small waterfall. Others uses sand in order to represent water, which surrounds huge rocks to represent a country. And to make sure that the Japanese landscape feel would be genuine is a total amount of tranquility, which would likely mean away from noisy neighbors.

It also applies with gates and walls, which uses bamboo that is found in most countries in Asia. Flora such as bonsai, sakura (Japanese cherry blossom tree), and pine trees are also part of Japanese gardens and landscapes. Other piece of decoration involves the usage of stone lanterns and steps, a koi (Japanese carp) pond, and even a small bridge.

Japanese landscape design is a lot more costly, considering the amount of rocks, sand and even effects like a bamboo water pendulum, that strikes the rock in a timely manner once water has been empty out by its weight. To begin with having a Japanese landscape is to have a sizeable piece of land required, usually best if starting from scratch for any homeowner. The cost may seem half as expensive as building a second house, but the ambience and the pleasing effect it brings would definitely make the investment worth it.

Landscaping Borders – Creating Privacy and Boundaries

If you have a garden that’s overlooked by other properties, or you want to create boundaries to section off different uses in your yard, then landscaping borders are just what you need. The great thing is that landscaping borders come in different shapes and sizes so you can still have the theme that you want for the overall landscaping design of the garden, while at the same time putting up a restrictive border.

Trees are a natural boundary, but the downside is that they take time to mature. Unless you can afford to buy mature trees that are several years old and are tall with many leaves (or evergreens), you are going to have to wait some time before your ideal privacy limit is reached. If you only need one tree, then buying an older tree isn’t going to be to expensive, but if you are using trees for your property outer perimeter landscaping borders, then things start to get very expensive.

One alternative that you could use is to set up a wooden fence just behind younger trees so that for a while it’s this fence that creates the landscaping border around the property. This will allow you privacy from neighbors, block out busy roads, provide security for your children who won’t be able to wander out of the garden so easily and yet is temporary and can be removed once the trees grow to the required height.

If you do create an outer perimeter landscape border whether using higher trees, or fences you need first to check if there are any local laws that control how high these can be. Often there is a maximum height for any given area and you must keep your fences under this. There could be a separate law that pertains to each tree, but if not, you will need to make sure that you cut your trees across the top just before they reach the legal maximum height – this will stop them growing upwards, but allow them to bush outwards instead.

Creating landscape borders within your garden are wonderful for providing separate places for kids to play football, or to hide garden toys from the rest of the house, create a secluded retreat where you can escape to when things get overly stressful, or just to separate a kitchen garden from the rest of the lawn. Landscape borders of this kind are can be low concrete blocks (some of these are very decorative and come in a variety of colors and designs) that edge your lawn, or higher trellises that allow you to also grow climbing flowers, shrubs or even vine fruits. The trellises in particular make for pretty garden features that don’t look as if they are landscape borders. Another idea would be to create a path in your garden that divides the kitchen garden from the rest of the yard. Edge the lawn and keep the earth in the kitchen garden in place, and this can be a perfectly functional and yet attractive yard.

Whatever landscape borders you choose, make sure they fit into the kind of design that you want, and that they match with the garden lifestyle that you have. Don’t create a fancy garden with lots of fragile borders if you have small children, but on the other hand, if you do have small children, a border is a perfect way of restricting them to certain parts of the yard so that you protect the shrubs, flowers, and/vegetables that you’re growing there.